Train your Dog to Give or Drop any Item

Roberto Manzotti

It is quite tempting to say that the ideal dogs would never put any substance in their mouths that we didn’t want them to put in. The ideal dogs don’t even scavenge, the ideal dogs never pick any of the inappropriate toys and start chewing. The ideal dogs will never try to get the rise out of you just because they’re feeling bored, but this kind of ideal dogs wouldn’t be dogs. Now you and I have realised that the perfect dog word suddenly starts sounding a lot less typical.
 

So the real truth is that our dogs are not that ideal dogs and they will put things in their mouths. The big thing is, it is quite lovely when they drop the things when we ask them to. The process of teaching your dog is quite simple, all you have to do is to be like a humble, patient and loving teacher and the things will go smoothly. Here’s the guideline on how to teach your dog correctly.
golden drop item

What not to do

First, you have to learn precisely what not to do. Don’t think that you are the Alpha and you can be able to order your dog to drop things out of its mouth anytime you want. Dogs are living animals and probably the most intelligent, loyal and sensitive pets (most of them) out in the world right now. Because most people get the results they want from their dogs by intimidating or scaring the crap out of them. Like one dog owner bellow “Jackie, drop that right now!” and Jackie says the dog version of “Holy crap!” and drops that thing at the very moment. 

Describing that, the dogs are dogs, they are not humans, and they will pick things up, but it’s quite sophisticated to teach them to bring or leave things out happily when we ask them to. The teaching process will take some time but not much. If Mr and Ms Jonathan reward Jackie for dropping whatever thing he will pick up, he might learn to drop items when his masters ask him. The case you heard in the above line is the best case scenario. Most of the times, Jackie won't be startled the second or the third time he hears "Jackie, drop that!" and he won't drop the item right away as he did before. Mr Jonathan will shout louder, and the end will be with no particular positive result. Jackie may be here is naturally timid, and Mr Jonathan gets quite used to being able to control him by just shouting at him. How funny will both of them look, kind of stupid right? Last possibility that is terrible news, pretty bad news actually: With angry looks, curls of lips, growls and sometimes even bites, Jackie will learn to guard whatever Mr Jonathan try to take away from him.

If your dog has the same problems, you better follow these steps written down below,

retriever give item

Step no 1. Trading up front for Food

First of all, give your dog something he likes to put in his mouth, a toy or anything else. You can have a good training session when your dog become absorbed entirely in the toy on his own. Both way, the toy should be the thing your dog likes but not something he isn't altogether crazy over. For the moment just let him settle in with his new prize.

Then bring something eatable like cookies or chicken that your dog loves. Also, use a clicker to mark the dog’s right choices, and don’t forget to get your clicker too. 

Then offer your dog one of those treats that he loves. High chances are he will drop the toy to take the tasty treat. The moment he drops that toy, say or click "Yeah!" Then give the treat right away as you pick up the toy. After he is finished eating the treat give him back his toy. Probably after some repetitions, your loving pet will no longer like to take the toy but that's is entirely okay. All you have to do is to end the dog training session with a bonus treat and follow the next step.

 

Step no. 2. Trading with no any food Up Front

All right let's get back to the last scenario your dog is wholly absorbed in his loving toy, but he doesn't entirely whack for. Bring your treats and that clicker ready. Next, reach that toy, but hide all the treats in a dish close to you somewhere and don’t make a mistake to show the treat to your dog. Because of former dog training, your dog will drop the toy when your hand comes close to him. Swiftly say "Yeah!" and give the excellent boy a sweet treat. Keep holding the toy while he eats the delicious treat and then provides the chew with or toy back to him.
 

Repeating a couple of times is necessary until your loving dog will stop re-taking the toy; after that end this training session.

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Step no 3. You have to teach your dog that the trade works everywhere

Practice the same dog training with multiple toys, balls and chews, find the one he loves and keeps working up more and more. Practice the same thing in numerous different locations and conditions, and better take him outside. Soon, your dog will really become good at trading. Choose items that are totally safe for your dog. Each time you change location and the object, you have to start from the beginning part where you offer your dog “the ultimate trade treat” up front. The bonus tip is to use the delectable treats.

At the time when your dog has become trained and obedient at dropping the toy or any other thing whenever you reach to take that, you should try to add the cue word. For example “Jonnie, give please!” because the polite cues will keep you remembered that you’re not having any showdown with your dog.

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